Izzo’s Illegal Burrito serves up fresh wraps

By By Brad Robichaux / American Press

Some things can be enticing specifically because they’re illegal, and perhaps that’s what the deliciously shady dealers of

illegal burritos at Izzo’s wants you to think.

Izzo’s Illegal Burrito has a major

presence in Baton Rouge and opened a Lake Charles operation a couple of

years ago. The

burrito racket has been good to them, and I think it’s because

it’s hard to find a high-quality burrito in more “coventional”

markets.

Despite the “illegal” association, the process, from production to consumption, is both quite transparent and organized with

rules.

Much like sandwich places such as Subway, Izzo’s makes your burrito from start to finish in front of you while you tell them what you want. The assembly follows

the same pattern for whether you order a burrito or a grilled quesadilla.

Patrons first choose from a list of

tortilla types and then choose a size: regular misdemeanor, super

felony, or illegal.

You can see the sizes hanging at the start of the assembly line,

and that illegal size looks so daunting I wouldn’t recommend

attempting it without an accomplice.

Accessories to your criminal meal include rice, beans and grilled onions and mushrooms, amidst such choices you can pick your

meat: chicken, steak, pork, beef or shrimp. From that, you can choose your vegetables and your sauces.

Burritos come tightly wrapped, from the tortilla’s roll-up itself to the foil around it. Most leave the foil on as they eat

the burrito, peeling it away as they eat. Do keep tabs on all pieces of foil, though, if some happen to slip away.

And though the wrapping job is

impeccably done, if your burrito comes with sauces, be prepared for your

meal to be a slippery

one. Sauces, while tasty, can also get quite messy. There are a

couple of napkin dispensers around the dinning area for extras

if you need them.

As alarming as the “illegal” designation can be, the whole set up is tongue-in-cheek. The meal is prepared in front of you,

and, as stated earlier, better-quality burritos are somewhat hard to come by.

I’d chosen a steak burrito with lettuce, tomato, pickled jalapeños, cheese and illegal sauce, a favorite from my time spent

in Baton Rouge and Izzo’s there, and I’m never disappointed.

Though it’s more expensive and requires a bit more time to prepare, the quesadillas are worth the wait if you’d like your

burrito-esque savory and hot.

Sometimes the illegal stuff can taste so good.