Take some steps to beat the heat

The American Press

<p class="p1">We’re now in grips of the hottest part of summer and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has given some timely advice to beat the extreme heat and avoid heat-related illness.</p><p class="p3">The CDC noted that extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. “Heat-related deaths and illnesses are preventable, yet many people still die from extreme heat every year,” a spokesman said.</p><p class="p3">The agency advises that heat-related illnesses are preventable and to take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated and keep informed.</p><p class="p3">Among the factors that affect the body’s ability to cool itself during extreme heat is high humidity, which prevents sweat from evaporating as quickly and from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.</p><p class="p3">Also personal factors can impact your ability to stay cool, such as age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn and prescription drug and alcohol.</p><p class="p3">People older than 65 and children younger than two, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness are at the highest risk.</p><p class="p3">Here are some tips from the CDC to avoid heat-related disease:</p><p class="p3">• Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible.</p><p class="p3">• Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an  extreme heat event.</p><p class="p3">• Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.</p><p class="p3">• Don’t use a stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.</p><p class="p3">• Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest. </p><p class="p3">• Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.</p><p class="p3">• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.</p><p class="p3">• Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually.</p><p class="p3">• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink more. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.</p><p class="p3">Have a fun summer, but stay cool and healthy. For more tips and information on heat-related disease, visit the CDC web site covering the topic at www.cdc.gov/features/extremeheat/index.html.</p>””<p>Drinking plenty of water, even if not thirsty, is one way to fight heat-related illness.</p>stock

life

Temporary water service interruption scheduled for Park Drive

Local News

Clement named interim police juror to fill Tramonte’s seat

Business

Red Lobster seeks bankruptcy protection days after closing dozens of restaurants

Local News

Iran’s president, foreign minister die in helicopter crash at moment of high tensions in Mideast

Local News

WikiLeaks founder Assange wins right to appeal against an extradition order to the US

Crime

Prosecution rests in Trump’s hush money case, and defense now gets its turn to call witnesses

Local News

Kennedy, Cassidy demand Biden withdraw rule that would transfer $147B in student debt to La. taxpayers

Local News

All SW La. school districts support Title IX lawsuit filed against DOE

Crime

5/20: Calcasieu Parish Sheriff announces arrest list

Local News

Power restored to most hit by deadly Houston storm with full service expected by Wednesday

Local News

ICC prosecutor seeks arrest warrant for Israeli and Hamas leaders, including Netanyahu

life

Jennings man nominated for three Inspirational Country Music Awards

McNeese Sports

Cowboys add Tulsa DB

life

Pat Deaville’s 11th book recounts his days as Lake Arthur band director

life

On Campus: SW La. students recognized for achievements

Local News

Hot weather poses new risk as thousands remain without power after deadly Houston storm

Local News

Higgins receives endorsement of House Majority Leader Steve Scalise

Local News

Portion of Calcasieu River closed to boat traffic

Business

Beauregard Health System breaks ground for new expanded emergency department

Business

LC Memorial Health preparing for hurricane season

life

Mental Health Awareness: Why it’s OK to ask for help when you’re not OK

Jim Beam

Jim Beam column: Landry scores major victory

McNeese Sports

Citizen enters Cowboy corral

Local News

Two new housing developments will cater to seniors nearing or in retirement