AP PHOTOS: Cars become home for Spain’s pandemic casualties

By ÁLVARO BARRIENTOS
Associated Press

PAMPLONA, Spain (AP) — When the social worker called to tell Javier Irure that he was being evicted, the 65-year-old Spaniard couldn’t fathom that he could end up homeless after five decades of manual labor.

“I grabbed some clothes, a few books and other things, wrapped them up in a bed sheet and told myself, ‘I have one more roof to put over my head: my car,’” Irure said from inside the old Renault Clio compact that has been his shelter for the past three months.

Irure belongs to the multitude of economic victims of the coronavirus pandemic. He managed to avoid getting COVID-19, but the labor slowdown caused by restrictions on movement and social activities the Spanish government imposed to control the spread of the virus proved lethal to his financial stability.

Irure, who started working at age 13 as a hotel bellhop, was working as a professional cleaner when the pandemic hit Spain last year and dried up his sources of income. It was not long before Irure was turned out of his rented apartment.

He tried to get help from public social services, but he relies on aid from local charity group Ayuda Mutua.

“You feel like a pendulum” dealing with the official bureaucracy, Irure said. “Going from one window to another, from calls that are never answered to vague promises.”

The pandemic has been particularly hard on Spain’s economy due to its reliance on tourism and the service sector. The country’s left-wing government has maintained a furlough program to reduce the impact, but over a million jobs have been wiped out.

While close-knit families have sustained many citizens who otherwise might have ended up destitute, confining people at home also has strained Spanish family life, as seen in a spike in divorce rates. The breakdown of households has left more individuals on their own.

Catholic aid organization Cáritas Española said earlier this month that around a half-million more people, or 26% of all its aid recipients, have reached out for help since the start of the pandemic. Cáritas opened up 13 centers dedicated to assisting the homeless since the pandemic began.

Like Irure, Juan Jiménez had no option but to live in his car, a second-hand Ford where he has slept for close to a year.

Jiménez, 60, saw his mortgage payments spiral out of control and his marriage crumble after he and his wife bought a bigger house. The 620 euros ($740) he received in government aid in recent months went to his seven children, he said.

“I dream of having all my children under one roof, but it is better that I am here,” Jiménez said. “They have their lives, and I would only be a problem.”

Jiménez and Irure move their cars from one parking spot to another on the outskirts of the northern Spanish city of Pamplona, where they once had homes. They do so to avoid drawing attention to themselves.

“When I wake up in the morning, I ask myself, ’What am I doing here?’” Jiménez said from his car, which is cluttered with clothes, blankets, and bags stuffed with all that he owns.

“We are invisible beings. Nobody wants to look at us. Nobody wants to know anything about us,” he said. “We do not exist.”

———

AP writer Joseph Wilson contributed to this report from Barcelona.

———

Follow AP’s pandemic coverage at:

https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-pandemic

https://apnews.com/hub/coronavirus-vaccine

https://apnews.com/UnderstandingtheOutbreak

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed without permission.

SportsPlus

Jim Beam

Jim Beam column:Constitution plan resurrected

high-school Sports

New concession stand added to plans for football stadium

life

Community rallies to support 3-year-old with brain tumor

Business

Jeff Davis School Board agrees to ITEP for solar facility project

Local News

Police Jury considers increases to grass ordinance fees

Local News

Qualifying ends, ballots set for November election

Local News

American Press winner of eight Louisiana Press Association awards

Local News

Allen Parish flood maps available for review

Local News

Ten Commandments won’t go in Louisiana classrooms until at least November as lawsuit plays out

Local News

Airlines, businesses hit by global technology disruption

McNeese Sports

Long road to McNeese

Business

Appeals court sends Commonwealth LNG decision back to FERC

Crime

Trooper arrested following off-duty DWI crash

Crime

Police: Attempted rapist broke into woman’s apartment through bathroom window

Local News

Daily showers, thunderstorms expected over next week

Crime

BREAKING: Police investigating early morning homicide

Local News

Council defers vote on potential Ernest and W. Claude development

life

Somber moment in community as Sacred Heart High School Gym demolished

Local News

Comedian Bob Newhart, deadpan master of sitcoms and telephone monologues, dies at 94

Local News

Trump has given no official info about his medical care for days since an assassination attempt

Local News

Lake Charles Police Department to host free National Night Out community event

life

Cajun Music and Food Festival introduces inaugural accordion contest

Crime

7/18: Calcasieu Parish Sheriff announces arrest list

Business

BREAKING: Smoke from Calcasieu Refinery blamed on flare