Take some steps to beat the heat

The American Press

<p class="p1">We’re now in grips of the hottest part of summer and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has given some timely advice to beat the extreme heat and avoid heat-related illness.</p><p class="p3">The CDC noted that extreme heat causes more than 600 deaths each year. “Heat-related deaths and illnesses are preventable, yet many people still die from extreme heat every year,” a spokesman said.</p><p class="p3">The agency advises that heat-related illnesses are preventable and to take measures to stay cool, remain hydrated and keep informed.</p><p class="p3">Among the factors that affect the body’s ability to cool itself during extreme heat is high humidity, which prevents sweat from evaporating as quickly and from releasing heat as fast as it may need to.</p><p class="p3">Also personal factors can impact your ability to stay cool, such as age, obesity, fever, dehydration, heart disease, mental illness, poor circulation, sunburn and prescription drug and alcohol.</p><p class="p3">People older than 65 and children younger than two, and people with chronic diseases or mental illness are at the highest risk.</p><p class="p3">Here are some tips from the CDC to avoid heat-related disease:</p><p class="p3">• Stay in air-conditioned buildings as much as possible.</p><p class="p3">• Do not rely on a fan as your primary cooling device during an  extreme heat event.</p><p class="p3">• Check on a friend or neighbor and have someone do the same for you.</p><p class="p3">• Don’t use a stove or oven to cook — it will make you and your house hotter.</p><p class="p3">• Limit outdoor activity, especially midday when the sun is hottest. </p><p class="p3">• Wear and reapply sunscreen as indicated on the package.</p><p class="p3">• Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.</p><p class="p3">• Pace activity. Start activities slow and pick up the pace gradually.</p><p class="p3">• Drink more water than usual and don’t wait until you’re thirsty to drink more. Muscle cramping may be an early sign of heat-related illness.</p><p class="p3">Have a fun summer, but stay cool and healthy. For more tips and information on heat-related disease, visit the CDC web site covering the topic at www.cdc.gov/features/extremeheat/index.html.</p>””<p>Drinking plenty of water, even if not thirsty, is one way to fight heat-related illness.</p>stock

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