Oberlin police chief cleared

Ethics board drops charges in LACE case

<p class="indent">OBERLIN — The state ethics board has dropped its case against Oberlin Police Chief Grady Haynes.</p><p class="indent">The ethics board issued charges against Haynes in January 2017 accusing him of violating ethics laws by getting paid his salary as police chief and receiving additional income for writing Local Agency Compensated Enforcement program at the same time.</p><p class="indent">The LACE program is a partnership between the district attorney, city judge and police chief that allows criminal court funds to pay off-duty officers to issue traffic citations.</p><p class="indent">Attorney Alesia Ardoin of the Law Office of R. Gray Sexton in Baton Rouge, who represented Haynes, said Wednesday the board voted in executive session to dismiss the charges on Oct. 18.</p><p class="indent">“We are happy the board was able to see that the charges were not supported and made a consensus decision without us having to incur additional taxpayer expenses for a trial,” Ardoin said.</p><p class="indent">Ardoin said evidence in the matter did not support the charges of any violations of the ethics code against Haynes because the town council adopted a resolution in late 2010 allowing the police chief to participate in the LACE program. Haynes said the ordinance was passed, but the council did not amend it to include the pay in his salary.</p><p class="indent">Haynes, who has been police chief since 2011, repeatedly denied the allegations saying he was only doing his job.</p><p class="indent">“I was only doing what I was asked to do,” Haynes said. “It was nothing but a political ploy from the onset, but I am glad it is finally over and I can get back to doing my job.”</p><p class="indent">In its earlier ruling the ethics board said it was unethical for the police chief to participate because he is on duty 24 hours a day, seven days a week and the program is run by his department. Ethics laws prohibit a public servant from being paid for doing the same work for which they have already been compensated.</p><p class="indent">Haynes received more than $72,000 for writing LACE tickets between 2013 and 2016, in addition to his annual salary of just over $33,000</p>””police chief

SportsPlus

Local News

Comedian Bob Newhart, deadpan master of sitcoms and telephone monologues, dies at 94

Local News

Trump has given no official info about his medical care for days since an assassination attempt

Local News

Lake Charles Police Department to host free National Night Out community event

life

Cajun Music and Food Festival introduces inaugural accordion contest

Crime

7/18: Calcasieu Parish Sheriff announces arrest list

Business

BREAKING: Smoke from Calcasieu Refinery blamed on flare

Jim Gazzolo

Jim Gazzolo column: Goff ready to turn the page on 2023

Local News

Toddler dies after shooting himself in the face, sheriff says

McNeese Sports

Early work for Cowboys

Local News

WEATHER WATCH: Torrential downpours in forecast

life

Chicken Fest: See plenty of poultry in motion Saturday at West Cal Arena

Local News

Enterprise Boulevard project goal: Strengthen connection between north, south LC

Local News

PHOTO GALLERY: Victory Day at Cowboy Stadium

Local News

Victory Day: McNeese players create field of smiles for special needs fans

Local News

Multiple failures, multiple investigations: Unraveling the attempted assassination of Donald Trump

Crime

7/17: Calcasieu Parish Sheriff announces arrest list

McNeese Sports

Fixer Upper

life

Library invites feedback on resident needs, library priorities

Local News

Speaker Johnson: ‘We will make American safe again’

life

PHOTO GALLERY: Summer Culinary Camp

Local News

Parlez-vous francais? French table group meets to practice their French-speaking skills

life

Exchange project allows teenagers to visit different states for free

Jim Beam

Jim Beam column: Assassination turmoil averted

Local News

Candidates begin qualifying for November election today