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LSU passing game coordinator Joe Brady works with LSU wide receiver Jaray Jenkins (83) during warmups before the first half of LSU's football game against Alabama at Bryant-Denny Stadium Saturday Nov. 9, 2019, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. LSU won 46-41.

On the Monday that he was named one of five finalists for the Broyles Award as the nation's top assistant coach, LSU's Joe Brady was also popping up as a potential candidate for a host of coordinator positions suddenly coming open.

Not bad for a 30-year-old just completing his first year as a full-time assistant coach.

But when you're the architect of the startling LSU offensive transformation that has the unbeaten Tigers headed to this week's SEC championship game against Georgia, it doesn't happen in a vacuum.

Among the most prominent suitors, according to numerous reports, could be Texas, where on Sunday head coach Tom Herman fired offensive coordinator Tim Beck.

Brady isn't technically the Tigers' offensive coordinator. Veteran Steve Ensminger has that role and the two work together closely on game plans and play-calling.

But head coach Ed Orgeron, whose coaching model is based on hiring high-profile (and high-paid) coordinators and letting them do their job, is confident he can keep the young wunderkind on staff.

"We're a step ahead," Orgeron said Monday of keeping Brady.

It was widely reported weeks ago that LSU was already in negotiations to sweeten Brady's $400,000 salary.

"I think we're in good shape," Orgeron said. "You want that with your assistants. You want them to have a lot of success. But we're going to compete. We have a plan in place. I think we're in good shape."

LSU and Orgeron have been in this situation before. When Jimbo Fisher was hired at Texas A&M following the 2017 season, he tried to lure rock star defensive coordinator Dave Aranda away from LSU to the Aggies.

LSU made Aranda college football's highest-paid coordinator at $2.5 million.

Brady came to LSU from Sean Payton's New Orleans Saints, where he was an offensive assistant (basically an assistant to the assistant coaches).

LSU assistants who were picking his brain on the spread offense during last offseason came away so impressed that they urged Orgeron to hire him full time.

His official title is passing game coordinator.

But with him the LSU offense, long perceived as being stuck in the stone age, has broken virtually every school offensive record and houses the front runner for the Heisman Trophy (Joe Burrow), a finalist for the Biletnikoff Award (Ja'Marr Chase) and a finalist for the Hornung Award (running back Clyde Edwards-Helaire).

Burrow, the transfer from Ohio State, first head of Brady from a former Buckeye friend J.T. Barrett, who was a quarterback on the Saints' practice squad last season.

"J.T. called me and told me I was going to love this guy," Burrow said. "We were going to be great friends. That's exactly what it's turned out to be. It's been great for us."

Orgeron seems confident it will continue.

"You know, this is Joe's first full-time job," Orgeron said a few weeks ago. "And I do believe he's very loyal to LSU, I do believe he likes what's going on at LSU, and obviously we're going to compete to keep him.

"A guy like that is going to have opportunities, but we're going to compete as best that we can to keep him. All those things are going to happen after the season."

"After the season, we have coaches that are going to get chances to go elsewhere, but the ones that we want to keep we're going to fight like heck to keep them."

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On the Monday that he was named one of five finalists for the Broyles Award as the nation's top assistant coach, LSU's Joe Brady was also popping up as a potential candidate for a host of coordinator positions suddenly coming open.

  • Updated

BATON ROUGE — Ed Orgeron made it abundantly clear that his team had unfinished business with Texas A&M before anybody in purple and gold turned their attention to Georgia and the Southeastern Conference Championship Game.

BATON ROUGE — No. 1 LSU punched its ticket to the Southeastern Conference championship game and locked up its first West Division crown since 2011 with a business-like 56-20 rout of Arkansas at Tiger Stadium on Saturday night.

About the best thing you can say about LSU's defense right now is that the Tigers are still perfect at holding teams to fewer points than LSU's high-powered offense can ring up.