CHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the sex crimes case against R&B singer R. Kelly (all times local):

6:45 a.m.

A publicist for R. Kelly says he plans to deliver a statement at a news conference in Atlanta about the R&B singer's arrest and federal indictment on 13 counts, including sex crimes and obstruction of justice.

Darrell Johnson declined to comment when reached by phone early Friday, saying he'd address the latest developments at the morning news conference.

Kelly, already facing sexual abuse charges brought by Illinois prosecutors, was arrested in Chicago Thursday on a federal grand jury indictment. U.S. Attorney's Office spokesman Joseph Fitzpatrick says Kelly was taken into custody about 7 p.m. and was being held by federal authorities.

The federal indictment was handed down earlier Thursday in federal court for the Northern District of Illinois.

———

12:15 a.m.

Singer R. Kelly was arrested in Chicago Thursday after he was indicted on 13 federal counts including sex crimes, a U.S. Attorney's office spokesman said.

Joseph Fitzpatrick said the R&B singer was taken into custody about 7 p.m. local time and was being held by federal authorities.

He was arrested after a 13-count federal indictment was handed down earlier Thursday in federal court for the Northern District of Illinois.

"The counts include child porn, enticement of a minor and obstruction of justice," Fitzpatrick said, adding that further details would be released Friday.

The R&B singer already faces separate state sex-related charges in Illinois involving four women, three of whom were minors when the alleged abuse occurred. He pleaded not guilty to those charges and was released on bail.

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