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Tuesday, September 30, 2014
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The Port of Lake Charles. (American Press Archives)

The Port of Lake Charles. (American Press Archives)

Port of LC’s assets stood at $365M on Dec. 31

Last Modified: Monday, April 14, 2014 12:39 PM

By Andrew Perzo / American Press

How much is the Port of Lake Charles worth? How much property does it own, and where is that property located?

Richert Self, the port’s administration and finance director, said total assets stood at $364,947,593 as of Dec. 31.

According to its most recent financial report — for 2011 and 2012 — the Port of Lake Charles owns about 4,000 acres of property in Southwest Louisiana.

“These properties include leased acreage to both traditional and non-traditional port related tenants, spoil disposal sites, and acreage available for future development,” reads the report.

“During 2012, lease revenues accounted for approximately $11.9 million, or 35% of total District operating revenues.”

A map of land owned by the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District is available at http://portlc.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/08/port-properties.pdf.

Among its property holdings are areas along the Calcasieu River, tracts on the rail line south of Tank Farm Road and land to the east of Chennault International Airport.

Law exempts some from jury duty

How does one get out of serving on a jury, and is it against the law to say you’re a prejudiced person?

People may be excused from jury duty if they apply for a medical or a personal difficulty hardship, said Calcasieu Clerk of Court Lynn Jones.

Additionally, they may be excused if they claim one of two legally established exemptions — they’re age 70 or older or they’ve served on a jury within the preceding two years.

As for the second question, no, it isn’t illegal to say during jury questioning that you dislike certain groups of people.

To claim an exemption or seek disqualification, write to Jury Office, 1001 Lakeshore Drive, Lake Charles, LA 70601.

“No exemptions or postponements can be granted after the Wednesday preceding your first day of service,” reads the clerk of court’s website.

“The court will make a decision on your claim and notify you.”

The qualifications for jury duty, according to the site:

Must be a U.S. citizen and at least a one-year resident of the parish.

Must be at least 18.

Must be able to read, write and speak English.

“Must not be incapable of serving as a Juror because of a mental or physical infirmity, provided that no person shall be deemed incompetent solely because of the loss of hearing to any degree (a written medical excuse from your doctor is required).”

“Must not be under indictment for a felony, nor convicted of a felony for which a pardon has not been granted.”

Online: www.calclerkofcourt.com.

The Informer answers questions from readers each Sunday, Monday and Wednesday. It is researched and written by Andrew Perzo, an American Press staff writer. To ask a question, call 494-4098 and leave voice mail, or email informer@americanpress.com.

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