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Thursday, September 18, 2014
Southwest Louisiana ,
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Students, parents and teachers estimate the number of items in jars at Barbe Elementary during an event for a hands-on look at math and science in action. The school’s annual Tackling Common Core Through STEM brought teachers and community members together to give parents an inside look at how their children are learning in the classroom. (Kirk Meche / Special to the American Press)

Students, parents and teachers estimate the number of items in jars at Barbe Elementary during an event for a hands-on look at math and science in action. The school’s annual Tackling Common Core Through STEM brought teachers and community members together to give parents an inside look at how their children are learning in the classroom. (Kirk Meche / Special to the American Press)

Common Core foes plan meeting

Last Modified: Tuesday, February 04, 2014 11:03 AM

By Kara Carrier / American Press

The statewide group Stop Common Core in Louisiana, which opposes the Common Core State Standards, will host a public forum Feb. 20 in Baton Rouge. 

The forum is scheduled for 6 p.m. at the Crossfire Auditorium. 

A news release from the group said that “Stop Common Core in Louisiana is a coalition of concerned parents working together to bring awareness to this federal overreach called the Common Core Standards Initiative.” The group said it’s committed to working for educational freedom and keeping education local.

Kathryn Goppelt, a spokesperson for the group, said the forum will feature six panelists who play a large role in critical discussions of the CCSS. 

“Our panelists notably include Dr. James Milgram who was a member of the initial Common Core workgroup, which devised the standards,” Goppelt said. “Also attending is Dr. Sandra Slotsky who was a member of the Common Core Validation Committee.” 

The other panelists will be James Stergios of the Pioneer Institute, Jane Robbins of the American Principles Project, Emmett McGroarty of the American Principles Project and Hillsdale College’s Terrence Moore.

Goppelt said the forum’s purpose is to give information and educate parents about the standards and answer any questions they may have. 

Goppelt said topics to be addressed during the forum include who actually wrote the CCSS, funding for development, who is supporting and marketing the standards, rigor, cost to states and more.

Goppelt said the forum is for parents and anyone who has concerns about the new standards. 

“Many parents are seeing things in their children’s homework and don’t understand where it’s coming from,” she said. “So these people on the panel are going to be able to give them answers. They are educators and will be able to give parents a first-hand education specifically about Common Core, why it’s not working and about education in general.”

Goppelt said many of the topics discussed at the forum will play a major role in upcoming legislation. 

“We are expecting a full house because we have a statewide network,” Gopplet said. “We want to hear from everyone with concerns, even those who are pro-Common Core. We’d like to hear what all the experts are saying.”

Tickets can be purchased in advance for $10 online at www.louisianacore.com or $20 at the door.

For more information, contact Goppelt at 225-241-9485 or email commoncoreforumla@gmail.com.

Posted By: Conservative1 On: 2/13/2014

Title:

Mr. Tritico,
Your comments would befit an outright socialist nation where collectivism and collectivist approaches are the goal but that is not the American way. In respecting individual freedom and state sovereignty, a requirement as was the case, of whole adoption with nominal changes allowed to these "national standards" called Common Core, goes against every aspect of having the freedom of each state to locally set the bar for that which it wants to achieve. You should recommend but not tie the hands of the state. As an attorney, educated in LA public schools by awesome public school teachers, I can tell you that poverty is the problem and the mentality that breeds that situation embeds it in our state. However, it most certainly is not solely LA standards and further, the national Common Core does not in any way address that or "performance" on assessments, which LA performance though ranked 46 & 47 was really only less than a 4% difference from the #1 ranked state. Our LA standards were rated 2nd in the nation and with minor improvements would go beyond the Common Core and with commitment to continued improvement upon that which we have proven progress, we could easily change that "stereotype" to which you refer. Moreover, where is your proof that these national standards are in fact better? There is none and 46 states adopting them site unseen, or baseless claims, does not provide that proof. You need to educate yourself on Common Core because your comments reveal your lack of understanding. You should probably attend the forum on the 20th if you truly care.

Posted By: Michael Deshotels, Retired teacher On: 2/13/2014

Title: Mr.

I believe Mr. Tritico is misinformed. The latest rating of all the state standards by Education Week in its Quality Counts survey rated Louisiana school standards and accountability rules as second among all 50 states. That was before we considered these new National Commom Core standards. If we adopt the new standards we may actually be reducing our state standards. Go to http://www.edweek.org/ew/qc/2013/state_report_cards.html to read the report.

Posted By: Michael Tritico On: 2/6/2014

Title: Educational standards

I have been watching the decline in Louisiana's educational system for decades. When I was in public schools in Calcasieu Parish in the 1950s students were expected to work hard and learn plenty. We did. I have attended universities in several states and, even one time when I was told by administrators that, "Since you are from Louisiana, maybe you should just audit this course. The top students of oceanography from around the world will be in the course," I not only held my own but set the curve. It grieves me to see an attitude of "we cannot expect our students to meet those national standards, we must keep control of the standards here, where we know our kids' limitations." Keeping our people poorly-educated surely does make for a cheap labor force, people desperate to grab whatever the carpetbagging corporations want to dole out just to keep them slaving away and quiet. If Louisiana has become so dumbed-down that it cannot see its own potential, then maybe it deserves what is coming, a state full of compliant servants custom-made to line the pockets of interlopers here to rip off our natural resources and laugh all the way to the big banks up north.

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